Computed Tomography Scans

C.T. technology allows the physician to see and analyze detailed internal structures in the body. The Vital Imaging Computer Workstation, a component of the Toshiba Aquilion 16-slice scanner, allows the Radiologist to reconstruct and view organs in additional planes and three-dimensional images. This allows the Radiologist to locate plaque in coronary vessels and to "fly through" colons as an alternative to colonoscopy. This CT scanner also performs cardiac scoring and lung screening exams. These non-invasive tests can detect early warning signs of heart attack or lung cancer. Jackson County Hospital was the first facility in Alabama to offer the level of technology provided by the Toshiba Aquilion 16-slice C.T. system.

C.T. scan of the head
Purpose

A C.T. scan is a special kind of x-ray that can produce pictures of a cross section of a part of the body. The C.T. scanner uses a computer to help make the x-ray pictures. A C.T. scan can be used to diagnose a variety of conditions and diseases that conventional x-rays cannot diagnose. A head C.T. can show the brain and other structures inside the skull. It may be used to diagnose tumors, blood clots, aneurysms, sinusitis and certain disorders of the jaw, mandible (jaw bone), eyes or face. These exams are not difficult or painful for you.

Preparation
  • If you are an outpatient, please be at the X-ray admissions office 15 minutes prior to your scheduled exam time.
  • You should plan to spend about one hour in the Radiology department for your test.
  • You should wear comfortable clothing.
  • You will be asked to remove hairpins or other items worn in the hair or on your head, since these may contain metal.
  • You will be asked to remove any jewelry being worn on your face, ears or neck.
  • You will be asked a series of questions concerning your medical history, especially the medical problem for which you were referred.
Procedure
  • You will be asked to lie down on the exam table. The technologist will secure your head with straps to help keep you from moving.
  • You may or may not need to receive an IV contrast medium. If you should need to receive contrast, an IV will be started at some point during the exam.
  • You will be asked to hold very still while a series of scan pictures are made.
After the exam
  • You may continue your normal activities and diet.
  • If you received IV contrast, you should drink lots of water, fruit juices, or other liquids.
  • The results of your exam will be reported to your physician within 24 hours.

If you have any further questions, please call the Radiology Department at 256.218.3850.

C.T. scan of the abdomen or pelvis
Purpose

A C.T. scan is a special kind of x-ray that can produce pictures of a cross section of a part of the body. The C.T. scanner uses a computer to help make the x-ray pictures. A C.T. scan can be used to diagnose a variety of conditions and diseases that conventional x-rays cannot diagnose. A body C.T. scan can show certain internal organs and structures that cannot be studied in as much detail with conventional x-rays. It can detect tumors, cysts, areas of infection and other problems that may occur in the abdomen and pelvis. These exams are not difficult or painful for you.

Preparation
  • If you are an outpatient, please be at the X-ray admissions office 15 minutes prior to your scheduled exam time.
  • You may be asked to take a laxative on the night prior to your scheduled exam.
  • Do NOT eat or drink anything after midnight on the night prior to your exam.
  • You should wear loose, comfortable clothing.
  • You should plan to spend two to three hours in the Radiology department for your exam.
Procedure
  • You will be asked to drink three or more cups of a flavored liquid called oral contrast at intervals of 20 or 30 minutes prior to the exam.
  • You will be asked to take your clothes off and put on a hospital gown.
  • You will be asked a series of questions concerning your medical history, especially the medical problem for which you were referred.
  • You will have an IV line started to receive a contrast medium, which will help to demonstrate the blood vessels in your abdomen.
  • You may or may not be given a small amount of liquid contrast rectally.
  • You will be asked to lie down on the scan table.
  • You will be asked to hold still and to hold your breath while the scan pictures are being made.
After the scan
  • You should drink lots of fluids and juices.
  • You may resume your normal activities and diet.
  • The results of your exam will be reported to your physician within 24 hours.

If you have any further questions, please call the Radiology Department at 256.218.3850.

C.T. scan – three-phase liver

Everything is the same as for an abdomen C.T., except we will do multiple scans of your liver with and without contrast.

C.T. scan of the appendix

No IV contrast.
Rectal barium will be administered.
Scan time is approximately 10 minutes (from time you get on the table to when you go to the bathroom).

C.T. scan of the chest
Purpose

A C.T. scan is a special kind of x-ray that can produce pictures of a cross section of a part of the body. The C.T. scanner uses a computer to help make the x-ray pictures. A C.T. scan can be used to diagnose a variety of conditions and diseases that conventional x-rays cannot diagnose. A chest C.T. scan can show certain internal organs and structures that cannot be studied in as much detail with conventional x-rays. It can detect tumors, cysts, areas of infection and other problems that may occur in the chest. These exams are not difficult or painful for you.

Preparation
  • If you are an outpatient, please be at the X-ray admissions office 15 minutes prior to your scheduled exam time.
  • You should plan to spend one to two hours in the Radiology department for your exam.
  • You should not eat or drink anything four to six hours prior to your scheduled exam.
  • You should wear loose, comfortable clothing.
Procedure
  • You will be asked to take your clothes off and put on a hospital gown.
  • You will be asked a series of questions concerning your medical history, especially the medical problem for which you were referred.
  • You will be asked to lie down on the scan table.
  • You will have an IV line started to receive a contrast medium that will help to demonstrate the blood vessels in your chest.
  • You will be asked to hold still and hold your breath while the scan pictures are being taken.
After the exam
  • You should drink lots of fluids.
  • You may resume your normal activities and diet.
  • The results of your exam will be reported to your physician within 24 hours.

If you have any further questions, please call the Radiology Department at 256.218.3850.

C.T. of the soft tissue of the neck
Purpose

A C.T. scan is a special kind of x-ray that can produce pictures of a cross section of a part of the body. The C.T. scanner uses a computer to help make the x-ray pictures. A C.T. scan can be used to diagnose a variety of conditions and diseases that conventional x-rays cannot diagnose. A C.T. scan of the soft tissue of the neck can show certain structures that cannot be studied in as much detail with conventional x-rays. It can detect tumors, cysts, areas of infection and other problems that may occur in the soft tissue area of the neck. These exams are not difficult or painful for you.

Preparation
  • If you are an outpatient, please be at the X-ray admissions office 15 minutes prior to your scheduled exam time.
  • You should plan to spend one to two hours in the Radiology department for your exam.
  • You should wear loose, comfortable clothing.
Procedure
  • You may be asked to take your clothes off and put on a hospital gown.
  • You will be asked a series of questions concerning your medical history, especially the medical problem for which you were referred.
  • You will be asked to lie down on the scan table.
  • You will have an IV line started to receive a contrast medium that will help to demonstrate the blood vessels and other structures in your neck.
  • You will be asked to hold still and not swallow while the scan pictures are being taken.
After the exam
  • You should drink lots of fluids if you received IV contrast.
  • You may resume your normal activities.
  • The results of your exam will be reported to your physician within 24 hours.

If you have any further questions, please call the Radiology Department at 256.218.3850.

C.T. of an extremity
Purpose

A C.T. scan is a special kind of x-ray that can produce pictures of a cross section of a part of the body. The C.T. scanner uses a computer to help make the x-ray pictures. A C.T. scan can be used to diagnose a variety of conditions and diseases that conventional x-rays cannot diagnose. An extremity C.T. scan of an arm or leg, sometimes applied specifically to a hand or foot, can show certain structures that cannot be studied in as much detail with conventional x-rays. It can detect tumors, cysts and areas of infection, alignment of bone fragments and other problems that may occur in an extremity. These exams are not difficult or painful for you.

Preparation
  • If you are an outpatient, please be at the X-ray admissions office 15 minutes prior to your scheduled exam time.
  • You should plan to spend one to two hours in the Radiology department for your exam.
  • You should wear loose, comfortable clothing.
Procedure
  • You may be asked to take your clothes off and put on a hospital gown.
  • You will be asked a series of questions concerning your medical history, especially the medical problem for which you were referred.
  • You may have to have plain x-ray films done of the area of interest, if these are not already available.
  • You will be asked to lie down on the scan table.
  • The technologist will position the extremity that is to be examined.
  • You will be asked to hold still while the scan pictures are being taken.
After the exam
  • The results of your exam will be reported to your physician within 24 hours.

If you have any further questions, please call the Radiology Department at 256.218.3850.

C.T. scan - spine, cervical, thoracic or lumbar
Purpose

A C.T. scan is a special kind of x-ray that can produce pictures of a cross section of a part of the body. The C.T. scanner uses a computer to help make the x-ray pictures. A C.T. scan can be used to diagnose a variety of conditions and diseases that conventional x-rays cannot diagnose. A spine C.T. scan can show certain structures that cannot be studied in as much detail with conventional x-rays. It can detect tumors, cysts, ruptured discs, nerve root compression and other problems that may occur in the spine. These exams are not difficult or painful for you.

Preparation
  • If you are an outpatient, please be at the X-ray admissions office 15 minutes prior to your scheduled exam time.
  • You should plan to spend one to two hours in the Radiology department for your exam.
  • You should wear loose, comfortable clothing.
Procedure
  • You may be asked to take your clothes off and put on a hospital gown.
  • You will be asked a series of questions concerning your medical history, especially the medical problem for which you were referred.
  • You may have to have plain x-ray film done of your spine, if these are not already available.
  • You will be asked to lie down on the scan table.
  • You will be asked to hold still while the scan pictures are being taken.
After the exam
  • The results of your exam will be reported to your physician within 24 hours.

If you have any further questions, please call the Radiology Department at 256.218.3850

C.T. – guided needle biopsy, cyst or abscess drainage
Purpose

A C.T. scan is a special kind of x-ray that can produce pictures of a cross section of a part of the body. The C.T. scanner uses a computer to help make the x-ray pictures. A C.T. scan can be used to diagnose a variety of conditions and diseases that conventional x-rays cannot diagnose. A C.T. scan can show certain structures that cannot be studied in as much detail with conventional x-rays. It can detect tumors, cysts and areas of infection, alignment of bone fragments and other problems that may occur. In cases of known cysts, abscesses or areas of the body that may require a drainage or biopsy procedure, the area can be localized in order to insert a long, small caliber needle into the structure to obtain tissue samples or for drainage.

Preparation
  • If you are an outpatient, please be at the X-ray admissions office 15 minutes prior to your scheduled exam time.
  • You should plan to spend two to four hours in the Radiology department for your exam.
  • You should wear loose, comfortable clothing.
  • You should not eat or drink anything for two to four hours prior to the exam.
Procedure
  • You will be asked to remove your clothing and put on a hospital gown.
  • The technologist and the Radiologist will explain the procedure and any possible complications to you.
  • You will be asked to sign a permit for the procedure to be done.
  • You will be asked to lie down on the scan table.
  • A series of scan images will be made to localize the area that is to be biopsied or drained.
  • After a site has been chosen, the Radiologist will clean the area thoroughly with a disinfectant.
  • You will be given a small injection of xylocaine in the skin to deaden the area where the needle will be inserted. You will feel a stinging sensation as this injection begins.
  • The long, small caliber needle will then be inserted with scans done during the insertion process to monitor the angle and depth of the needle. You may feel pressure at the insertion site, but you should not feel any pain.
  • After the needle is in the correct place, the fluid (for drainage procedures) or the tissue (for biopsy) will be removed through the needle.
  • After the drainage or biopsy is complete, the needle will be removed.
After the exam
  • The Radiologist will give you specific instructions about resuming your normal activities.
  • You may be asked to remain in the department for 30 minutes up to two hours after the procedure, so that you can be monitored for any bleeding or other complications.

If you have any further questions, please call the Radiology Department at 256.218.3850.

C.T. scan - renal

This scan is very fast.
It is used to see if you have a kidney stone.
It shows the kidneys, ureters and bladder
There is no preparation for this test.

CT - Screening Tests

These tests are not covered by insurance or Medicare.

Cardiac Scoring - The easy pain-free way to check for heart disease.
Lungs - A very fast test to check for masses in the lungs.
Total Body - A very fast test done to check for masses in the entire body (chest, abdomen and pelvis)

 

Highlands Imaging Center

Highlands Imaging Center
Phone: 256.218.3850